184th Security Forces Squadron support at inauguration

184th Security Forces Squadron personnel prepare gear and bag tags for their departure, McConnell Air Force Base, Kansas, Jan. 17. The Airmen provided security support for the inauguration of Donald Trump, the 45th president of the United States. (Air National Guard Photo by Senior Airman Lauren Penney)

184th Security Forces Squadron personnel prepare gear and bag tags for their departure, McConnell Air Force Base, Kansas, Jan. 17. The Airmen provided security support for the inauguration of Donald Trump, the 45th president of the United States. (Air National Guard Photo by Senior Airman Lauren Penney)

By Senior Airman Lauren, 184th IW Public Affairs

Early morning on Jan. 20, the 184th Security Forces Squadron was poised and ready to provide security support for the inauguration ceremony of Donald Trump, the 45th president of the United States.

“The state of Kansas was asked to participate and the task was divided between the 190th Air Refueling Wing, 184th Intelligence Wing and 35th Military Police Company,” said Senior Master Sgt. Stacie Smith, security forces manager, 184th Security Forces Squadron. “It was accomplished with 100% volunteers.”

Thirty-nine of 184th SFS personnel traveled to Washington D.C. to contribute security services for the inauguration and provided entry control at three separate access points to the event. They conducted crowd management, ensured protests were peaceful and they maintained a safe environment for attendees.

“We essentially provided a force multiplier for the volunteer personnel and secret service,” said Master Sgt. Brandon Murray, unit deployment manager, 184th SFS. “I would equate our involvement to being a visual for the public as well as eyes and ears for law enforcement.”

Protests, both peaceful and violent, surrounded the event, and police and military personnel were needed to do crowd control and stop violent protesters. The protests the 184th SFS encountered were non-violent. Out of the three posts managed by the 184th SFS, one had active protesters.

“There was a great deal of yelling amongst people of varying beliefs and some instigating tactics were attempted,” said Murray. “However, it was short lived due to their moving on.”

At the entry control point, three people were denied passage by the Transportation Security Administration due to inappropriate signs.

“They had options provided to them and chose to stand outside the entry control point and be engaged by members with differing views,” said Murray. “After a couple of exchanges they chose to discard their signage so they could enter the area.”

When the ceremony and festivities ended, the 184th SFS returned home safely.

“We consider it a huge success,” Smith said.