Muncy visits 184th IW, encourages Air Guardsmen to tell their stories

By Tech. Sgt. Jacob Lewis, 184th Public Affairs

Photos by Staff Sgt. Joe Thompson, 184th Public Affairs

MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Ks. (June 1, 2019) – Retired Chief Master Sgt. Christopher Muncy, 10th command chief to the director of the Air National Guard, gave a speech here about the importance of unit heritage and telling the ANG story.

Tech. Sgt. Tiffany Helm, president of the Non-commissioned Officer Council, introduced Muncy. Muncy served for more than 35 years and presently works for the Department of Defense as a civilian. He joined the Air Force in 1977, transitioned to the ANG in 1979, and retired in 2012.

Retired Chief Master Sgt. Chris Muncy, former command chief to the director of the Air National Guard, shakes hands with Tech. Sgt. Tiffany Helm, president of the Non-commissioned Officer Council, during his visit to the 184th Intelligence Wing at McConnell Air Force Base, June 1. Helm initiated the idea of Muncy’s visit after seeing him speak at a conference a few months prior. (Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Joe Thompson)

“It’s awesome to come back,” said Muncy. “The colonel and the command chief talked about our core values and the importance to know who you are. What is your identity?”

Muncy pointed out the Student Flight with red hats and explained how their hats honor Kansas Air National Guard heritage.

“That’s huge people,” said Muncy. “To know who you are and where you’ve been and what you’ve done. You take it for granted and forget about it. I’m here to tell you to please don’t do that. Talk about who you are. Tell your story.”

Muncy compared the ANG’s legacy to college athletics and asked if there were any Kansas University Jayhawk fans, Kanas State Wildcat fans, and Wichita State Shocker fans.

“All great institutions, all great teams, all that we rally around become our home,” said Muncy. “Are you doing that around us? Around the Air National Guard? It is imperative to tell our story.”

Muncy challenged the audience to take pride in the unit and it’s relation to the community. He explained that many in the community don’t know what the ANG does and that people in the community assume Guardsmen in uniform serve in the Army or fly planes. Many don’t know what the Air Guard’s mission is.

There are over 329 million Americans and military members make up less than one percent.

“The Air National Guard is the single largest entity in the United States Air Force,” said Muncy. “[Currently] 2.3 million serve in uniform in some capacity. That is active duty, Guard, and Reserve. The Guard and Reserve have 1.1 million and 1.2 million in active.”

Retired Chief Master Sgt. Chris Muncy, former command chief to the director of the Air National Guard, addresses the Fighting Jayhawks of the 184th Intelligence Wing, Kansas Air National Guard, during an all-call at McConnell Air Force Base, June 1. Muncy emphasized the importance of celebrating unit heritage and telling the Air National Guard story. (Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Joe Thompson)

According to Muncy, presidents and leaders across the globe want what the United States has achieved with their military force.

“Since 1974 our, military has been an all volunteer force,” said Muncy. “How about that? Do the math. Forty-five years of this. Across the country here and across the globe people said it would never work. If you ever go to war it’ll never happen. You still engage in a war on two fronts, 64 nations, from space and cyber, and there’s no draft. Thank you student flighters for stepping up. When we talk to other nations, they want to know how we have an all-volunteer force, and, can I have Guardsmen?”

Muncy contended that it is important to remember how the Guard started and how it became a volunteer force. He said the Guard is only as great as the members who volunteer to serve.

“Every single Airmen is critical to the fight,” said Muncy. “Remember your Wingmen. The Wingman Concept is more critical than all other things. Who is your Wingman? This is a Guard family. This is the strongest family in DOD.”

Let the world know who the ANG is, tell its story, remember its legacy and never forget that every member volunteered for a cause greater than their own.